Early last month Peter Drury entered an exciting new stage in his career and became Vice President for Mission Advancement at Make-A-Wish Foundation.

Member Capital - Introducing Peter Drury

by Ann Warman

Early last month Peter Drury entered an exciting new stage in his career and became Vice President for Mission Advancement at Make-A-Wish Foundation. 

 

Peter's father, a builder from a long line of builders, founded Drury Construction Co. in 1972. They built well-known buildings such as Grace Episcopal Church; the Bainbridge Public Library; the Suquamish House of Awakened Culture; several Islandwood buildings; numerous commercial buildings; and the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial.

Peter's work and life embodies goodwill. His deep sense of social responsibility was nurtured by his family through their extensive involvement in community service. While Peter was growing up on Bainbridge, his family provided emergency shelter for children who had just been removed from their families to await foster placement. These foster kids touched Peter's life and profoundly influenced his calling. He saw, first-hand, the struggle that challenges these young people and the extreme disadvantages they must surmount.

During high school, Peter was active in student government and was continually involved in raising funds for causes. He knew many of our Bainbridge Rotary Exchange students and we once awarded him Rotary Student of the Month.

In the late 1980s, after completing his undergraduate degrees, Peter began work helping people with HIV/AIDS. Back then, people who contracted HIV/AIDS tragically died within weeks. Today he is a board member of the Women's Funding Alliance and has advised Seattle Children's, Splash, Sightline Institute, Rainier Valley Corps, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, the University of Washington and more. He is a Past President of AFP Advancement Northwest.

Peter holds M.B.A., M.S.W., and M.Div. degrees from Seattle University, the University of Illinois, and Yale University.

Through his involvement with Bainbridge Rotary, Peter hopes to help revitalize the youth exchange program and support our local projects. On his daily commute to Seattle, he walks off the ferry into the city, past the homeless tents beneath the bridge. He said, "We've all felt it, the visceral smells of the city instantly separate us from the island, every time we go across." For Peter, Rotary is his connection to home, and he treasures the friendships, service and purposeful community we make together.